Cardiology & Cardiovascular Serives at Marham Parham Medical Center


Accredited Chest Pain Center—24 hour emergency department
 
Cardiac Testing
  • Echocardiography
  • Stress Echocardiography
  • Transesophogeal Echocardiography
  • Ambulatory Blood Pressure Testing
  • Holter Monitor Testing
  • Event Monitor Testing
  • Exercise Stress Testing
  • Cardiac Nuclear Imaging
 
Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation
 
Northern Carolina Cardiology
 
Vascular Testing
  • Carotid Ultrasound
  • Venous Doppler
  • Arterial Doppler
  • Physiologic Arterial Testing
 
Echocardiography-- An echocardiogram is a procedure used to assess the heart's function and structures. During the exam, a transducer sends out inaudible, high frequency sound waves. The transducer is placed on the chest at certain locations and angles and the ultrasonic waves move through the body to the heart where the sound waves bounce (“echo”) off the heart structures. The transducer then picks up the reflected sound waves and sends them to a powerful computer. The computer interprets the data and displays the information as a set of still images and moving pictures of the heart and its structures.  In some cases, additional images may be needed that may require IV access. 
 
Prep/info:  Please allow an hour for this exam.  Wear two piece clothing. Patient must be able to lie still throughout the exam.
 
Stress Echocardiography--This exam utilizes EKG and echocardiogram equipment to obtain pictures (echo) and electrical analysis (EKG) of the heart before (resting), during, and immediately after a period of stress (peak stress).   This stress is produced either by walking on a treadmill or through the use of medications when the patient is unable to walk on a treadmill.  All of the information obtained during the stress testing generates information that the cardiologist uses to determine the possibility cardiac abnormalities.
 
Prep/info:  Please allow an hour for this exam.  Wear two piece clothing and comfortable walking shoes. Patient must be able to lie still throughout the exam.  Do not apply oils or lotions to the chest before exam. Additional preparation information is provided by the ordering physician.
 
Transesophogeal Echocardiography--A transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) is more invasive than the other types of echocardiography. This exam, which involved sedation, uses a specialized probe that is passed through the patient's mouth and into the esophagus by the cardiologist. From this perspective, the cardiologist can visualize structures of the heart that cannot be seen by conventional echocardiography due to various patient conditions. The esophagus lies directly behind the heart, so TEE images provide higher-resolution images of certain structures of the heart.
 
Prep/info:  Information regarding preparation for this exam is given to the patient prior to testing by the ordering physician and out-patient ambulatory services department.
 
Ambulatory Blood Pressure Testing--Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring is a painless way to record your blood pressure away from the doctor’s office. It is a small computer that is carried on the waist attached to a blood pressure cuff that is worn around the arm.  The device records your blood pressure at set intervals throughout a 24 hour period of time.  The data is recorded and sent to the cardiologist to review and interpret. The monitor is returned by the patient at the end of the monitoring period.
 
Prep/info:  Please allow 15-20 minutes for application of the device.  Wear two piece clothing with very loose or short sleeves. Patient will not be able to bath, shower or swim while wearing the monitor. 
 
Holter Monitor Testing-- Holter monitoring is a painless way to record your heartbeat away from the doctor’s office. It is a small electrocardiogram (EKG) that you carry with you and records your heartbeat for your doctor to review later. The Holter Monitor records all of your heartbeats over a specific period of time (generally 24 hours).
The monitor is a small device that can be hooked to your belt or placed in a pocket. There are several small pads (electrodes) that are placed on your chest and wires are attached. The monitor is returned by the patient at the end of the monitoring period.
 
Prep/info:  Please allow 15-20 minutes for application of the device.  Wear two piece clothing. Do not apply oils or lotions to the chest before exam.  Patient will not be able to bath, shower or swim while wearing the monitor. 
 
Event Monitor Testing-- Event monitoring is a painless way to record your heartbeat away from the doctor’s office. It is a small electrocardiogram (EKG) that you carry with you and records your heartbeat for your doctor to review later. The Event Monitor lets you record your irregular heartbeat as you feel it by simply pressing a button (or other method). You may carry this monitor for days or weeks, but is usually kept for 30 days.
The monitor is a small device that can be hooked to your belt or placed in a pocket. There are a few small pads (electrodes) that are placed on your chest and wires are attached. You can disconnect the device to take showers.  The monitor is returned by the patient at the end of the monitoring period.
 
Prep/info:  Please allow 15-20 minutes for application of the device.  Wear two piece clothing. Do not apply oils or lotions to the chest before exam.
 
Exercise Stress Testing--An Exercise Tolerance Test (ETT) or Stress Test is used to provide information about how the heart responds to stress. It usually involves walking on a treadmill at increasing levels of difficulty, while an EKG and blood pressures are monitored. By placing the stress of exercise on the heart, the test can help to determine if there is adequate blood flow to the heart during increasing activity and help to determine the best cardiac treatment plan for you.
 
Prep/info:  Please allow an hour for this exam.  Wear two piece clothing and comfortable walking shoes.  Do not apply oils or lotions to the chest before exam.  Additional preparation information is provided by the ordering physician.
 
Cardiac Nuclear Imaging-- A nuclear heart scan is a test that provides important information about the health of your heart.  For this test, a safe, radioactive substance called a tracer is injected into your bloodstream through a vein. The tracer travels to your heart and releases energy. Special cameras outside of your body detect the energy and use it to create pictures of your heart.  Usually, two sets of pictures are taken during a nuclear heart scan. The first set is taken right after a stress test while your heart is beating fast.
During a stress test, you exercise to make your heart work hard and beat fast. If you can't exercise, you might be given medicine to increase your heart rate. The second set of pictures is taken later, while your heart is at rest and beating at a normal rate.
 
Prep/info:  Wear two piece clothing and comfortable walking shoes.  Do not apply oils or lotions to the chest before exam.  Additional preparation information is provided by the ordering physician.
 
Carotid Ultrasound-- This is an ultrasound imaging and Doppler exam of the carotid arteries that carry blood to the brain. Common reasons to perform this exam are a history of stroke (cerebral vascular attack or CVA), transient ischemic attack (TIA) with weakness/numbness on the left or right side of the body, vision changes in one eye (temporary blindness), or when a murmur is heard in the neck vessels (bruit).
 
Prep/info:  Please allow an hour for this exam.  Wear two piece clothing. Patient must be able to lie still throughout the exam.
 
Venous Doppler-- This is an ultrasound imaging and Doppler exam of the veins of the arms or legs. It allows the physician to "see" inside the vessel and, by using color flow and other Doppler techniques, evaluate the flow of blood and determine if a blood clot is present. This is useful for patients with suspected deep vein thrombosis (DVT).
 
Prep/info:  Please allow an hour for this exam.  Wear two piece clothing. Patient must be able to lie still throughout the exam.
 
Arterial Doppler-- This is an ultrasound imaging exam of the arteries of the arms or legs. It allows the physician to "see" inside the vessel. By using color flow and other Doppler techniques, the physician can evaluate the flow of blood and determine if any restriction or stenosis of the vessel is present. This exam is generally performed on patients with recent extremity arterial stenting or bypass grafts to confirm that the intervention is functioning correctly.
 
Prep/info:  Please allow an hour for this exam.  Wear two piece clothing. Patient must be able to lie still throughout the exam.
 
Physiologic Arterial Testing-- This is an indirect testing exam of the arteries of the arms or legs. By using a simple ultrasound probe and several blood pressure cuffs on the arms and legs at specific spots, this exam evaluates the flow of blood and helps to determine if any narrowing or stenosis of the vessel is present, and to what degree. This exam provides arterial waveforms, pulse volume recordings, segmental pressures, ABIs and toe pressures (when indicated). 
 
Prep/info:  Please allow an hour for this exam.  Wear two piece clothing. Patient must be able to lie still throughout the exam.  Bandages, wraps, inability to lie still, and obesity may prevent the acquisition of some or all of the data needed for an interpretable exam.